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Cesran International

Recent Articles

  • The Dynamics and the Roots of the France’s Security Policy Towards Africa

    France has “special” economic and political relations with Francophone African countries, dating back to the 19th century, and retains its military bases in Gabon, Senegal, the Ivory Coast, Djibouti, and the Central African Republic. France’s security policy towards Africa has changed according to its economic, political and strategic interests. It has been linked with the concepts

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  • How Turkey is Emerging as a Development Partner in Africa

    Turkey provides assistance for relief aid and reconstruction, but also works as a business partner and invests in youth education. BY PROFESSOR ALPASLAN OZERDEM | APRIL 13, 2013 Turkey has emerged as a generous donor for humanitarian crises across the world over the past five years, especially in the context of Africa. In 2011, while

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  • Sudan and South Sudan’s Unresolved Post-Independence Issues

    BY PROFESSOR STEFAN WOLFF | AUGUST 18, 2012   On 2 August 2012, a deadline set by the African Union and endorsed by the Un Security Council for Sudan and South Sudan to reach a comprehensive settlement on unresolved issues stemming from their separation in 2011 passed without an agreement being achieved. Negotiations, however, continued. Despite

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  • Yemen’s Transition: Key Challenges for the National Dialogue

    Ali Abdullah Saleh’s autocratic rule in Yemen comes to an end on 21 February 2012 after 33 years as a new interim president is elected in the country which remains deeply fragile and divided. The outcome of these elections is as predictable as it is certain that they are at best the beginning of a difficult transition

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  • What next for Saif Gaddafi, Libya and the ICC?

    On Monday 21st January a deadline that it now appears was not only arbitrary but also purely notional elapsed. This was the deadline for the current Libyan government to tell the International Criminal Court what they were going to do with the two remaining indictees of the ‘Tripoli Three’ – Saif al-Islam Gaddafi and Abdullah

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  • Somalia: “A famine Caused by Men, not by Global Warming”

    Written by T. J. COLES In 2006, Britain and America began a proxy war in Somalia by training Ethiopian warlords to invade the country in order to destroy the government, the Islamic Courts Union—and with it any chance of socioeconomic recovery. Journalist Aidan Hartley reported that under the leadership of the Western-backed Abdullahi Yusuf, who

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  • Almost One Year on: Three Lessons from the Arab Spring

    Written by PROF. STEFAN WOLFF When Mohamed Bouazizi, a jobless graduate in the provincial city of Sidi Bouzid in Tunisia, about 200km southwest of the capital Tunis, set himself on fire on 18 December 2010 after police had confiscated a cart from which he was selling fruit and vegetables, few would have predicted that this event

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  • Libya after Gadhafi: Challenges and Opportunities

    Written by PROF. STEFAN WOLFF Friday, 28 October 2011 19:06 With Colonel Gadhafi dead and the last major strongholds of his supporters now under the control of the new government, the National Transitional Council (NTC) is expected to declare the country’s liberation on 23 October and officially begin the transition period envisaged to culminate in

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  • The Murder of Kaddafi by lynch Mob and a Dark Start to “New” Libya

    Written by PROF. BÜLENT GÖKAY Friday, 28 October 2011 18:36 The killing of Muammar Kaddafi on 20 October 2011 by an armed lynch mob and the victory of the rebel forces have been quickly celebrated by the US President Obama and other leaders of the NATO countries, whose warplanes massively bombed the cities of Libya

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  • Farewell To The Great Loon

    Written by WALTER RUSSELL MEAD Saturday, 22 October 2011 06:44 Africa’s King of Kings, the Sword of Islam, the Guide of the People and the Great Loon of Libya is gone.  The crowds kicked his lifeless body through the streets of his hometown.  Those who trusted in him and who aided and abetted his crimes,

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  • Nigeria – Ensuring [un] Rule of Law

    Written by BALA MOHAMMED LIMAN Friday, 21 October 2011 08:28 The current crisis in the Nigerian Judiciary is indicative of the failure of the executive arm of government to allow the judiciary to attain some level of independence and autonomy. An independent and autonomous judiciary is important for ensuring respect for the rule of law

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