Cesran International

Recent Articles

  • Gendered (In)Securities: Refugee Camps in Southeastern Turkey

    By Dr. Selin Akyüz* and Dr. Bezen Balamir Coşkun** Abstract Academic literature on security and securitization has been criticized for neglecting the significance of gender as a dimension of security. Literature on security within international relations discipline, whether in the West or in Turkey, has been inadequately engaged in analyzing the pervasive insecurities of women

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  • Turkey Urgently Needs to Integrate Its Syrian Refugees

    ­ Since 2011, more than 3.2m Syrians are known to have taken refuge in Jordan, Lebanon, Turkey and a number of other countries. The real scale of the crisis is likely to be much greater, as not all refugees are registered with UNHCR. In Lebanon, for example, the official figure is 1.1m, but according to

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  • Methodological differences of the PKK, KCK and HDP

    Since the PKK was established an illegal, armed organization, it has always been revolutionary in the way it obtained its results regardless of a transformation from separate state to democratic autonomy. There was no official alternative to supersede this methodology until the People’s Labor Party (HEP) was brought to life in 1991. Due to the

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  • UNESCO as an Ethno-Political Entrepreneur: The Need for Emancipating LAVASH

    United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO), more specifically the Intergovernmental Committee for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage, has recently decided that lavash is an intangible cultural heritage of Armenia or the Armenian nation. Having looked at the popularity and the communality in terms of consumption of lavash – a type of

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  • Anatomy of the PKK: Violence and Self-Interest

    It might be quite bold to say, but the PKK does not care about anything but the existence of Kurdish cantons in Syria. It cares about this much more than the lives and the future of Kurds. The PKK and its institutional industry have still not taken lessons from the violence that resulted from calling

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  • Nongovernmental Humanitarianism In Turkey: The Quest For Internationalist Virtue

    The last decade has been a golden age in the history of Turkey`s international humanitarian initiatives. Today, Turkey`s humanitarian aid organizations, both state institutions and civil society organizations, operate in over 100 countries worldwide. Thanks to the opportunity spaces created throughout the last decade, by which religious civil society was successfully de-securitized after an almost

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  • Religiously Framing Turkey’s Humanitarian and Cultural Diplomacy

    Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoğlu, in explaining the rationale behind the presence of multiple institutions in running Turkey’s foreign affairs, articulated that “the multi-faceted foreign policy of Turkey could not be accomplished merely with the traditional foreign policy tools and frameworks.” Having this idea in mind has led to the foundation of new institutions with international

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  • Brazil’s Presidential Election: Impacts on Relations with Turkey

    Millions of Brazilians went to the polls on Oct. 5 to elect the new president of Brazil. There were three frontrunner candidates: Dilma Rousseff, the incumbent and the leader of the Workers’ Party; Aecio Neves, leader of Brazilian Social Democracy Party and Marina Silva, former environment minister. According to the Datafolha’s poll, which was conducted

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  • Enduring Freedom: Public Diplomacy and US Foreign Policy

    By Prof. Scott Lucas On 14 October 2001, President George W. Bush complained to a prime-time press conference, “I’m amazed that there is such misunderstanding of what our country is about that people would hate us. I, like most Americans, I just can’t believe it, because I know how good we are.”[iii] The President’s plaintive

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  • Realities of the Gezi Park

    There has been a newly emerged concept of “Gezi Parki” the meaning of which resonates in “resistance” against the AKP government and specifically to Recep Tayyib Erdogan, the Prime Minister of Turkey.     BY RAHMAN DAG | JUNE 15, 2013 This concept transcends its literal meaning of standing up against felling of trees in

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  • Turkish Nationalists Have Hard Days Ahead

    BY HUSREV TABAK** | 07 APRIL 2013   It has been proven that being a nationalist in a country in transition from a modernist national period to a post-national one is a hard burden to shoulder. This has been experienced in the Balkans as their post-war reconstruction practices repelled any nationalistic discourse and broke down all

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  • Practical Indications of the Peace Process in Full Bloom

    The most comprehensive peace process between the Turkish state and the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) bore its first fruit this spring. BY RAHMAN DAG | MARCH 24, 2013 Despite the fact that there were other initiatives between the state and the PKK, the first of which was conducted by Turgut Özal, the second one by

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  • Albanian Awakening: The Worm has Turned!

    Remarks articulated last week by Hakan Şükür, a famous former football player and current parliamentary deputy, garnered widespread attention and reminded the public that there are ethnic Albanians living in Turkey. BY HUSREV TABAK | MARCH 03, 2013 Şükür stated: “For the sake of national unity, racial discourse should be left aside. If we perceive our

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