Cesran International

Recent Articles

  • €-Day: Just How Broke Are We Europeans?

    Written by PROF. JULIAN LINDLEY-FRENCH Saturday, 03 December 2011 16:02 Oslo, Norway. 2 December. €-Day approacheth and with it the Onion’s day of reckoning. Norway is not in the EU and yet strangely there is no visible sign that civilisation is about to collapse. Quite the reverse! Indeed, it is nice to be in a country

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  • Does Germany Really Want to Save the Euro?

    Written by PROF. JULIAN LINDLEY-FRENCH Does Germany really want to save the Euro? The great Austrian strategist Count Metternich once famously said that when Paris sneezes, Europe catches cold. Today, he would probably substitute Berlin for Paris. I have just spent the weekend with close German friends in beautiful Vienna. The sense of pending doom

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  • What exactly would the UK gain from leaving the EU?

    Written by JUSTIN STARES Wednesday, 09 November 2011 08:28 Could the United Kingdom leave the European Union while maintaining the free trade agreement that Norway enjoys with the bloc? There are on the face of it many advantages to a free trade agreement with the EU over full membership. If Britain were to withdraw from

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  • From One Debt Bubble to Another – Europe is Rrunning out of Ideas

    Written by DEAN CARROLL Friday, 21 October 2011 08:15 Many are holding their breath in anticipation that the eurozone summit on Sunday will result in an all-dancing, all-singing solution to fix the problems of the single currency – once and for all. Given the track record of snail-pace progress at these set-piece events, it seems

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  • Long Road Ahead: Skopje-Brussels, via Athens

    Written by GJORGJI STAMOV Wednesday, 05 October 2011 16:39 The Republic of Macedonia pursued a policy of peaceful independence from war-ravaged Yugoslavia in 1991. Considering the devastating outcome of that war, Macedonia’s achievement deserves recognition. Secession, however, was not met without problems of its own. Internally, the communist party lost credibility, the economy was collapsing,

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  • A Bolder Barroso: Too Little, Too Late?

    By FRANCESCO GUARASCIO | 03.10.2011 European Commission President José Manuel Barroso waited until nearly the middle of his second mandate to show bold ambitions for the European project, but his move has likely come too late. In his annual State of the Union address in the European Parliament last week, Barroso promised that Greece would

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  • The Obstacles to Sustainable Peace and Democracy in Post-Independence Kosovo

    BY GEZIM VISOKA** | 17.08.2011 Introduction Even after ten years of international administration and almost three years since its declaration of independence from Serbia, Kosovo continues to face ethnic and socio-economic problems, as well as fundamental challenges to its governance and sovereignty that have the potential to undermine the progress achieved and threaten Kosovo’s stability.

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  • Do You Agree that the UK has Ignored the Threat from the Far Right?

    By Dr Chris Allen** | 31.07.2011 “As news began to break about the atrocities committed in Oslo and Utøya on 22 July, a number of media outlets began to suggest that Al-Qaeda (AQ) was behind the attacks. Disparate reasons were put forward as to why this might be so: Norway’s involvement in Afghanistan and Libya,

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  • Oslo Massacre: is Old Europe Back?

    BY ASSOC. PROF. GÖKHAN BACIK** | 26.07.2011 Norwegian academic Bernt Hagtvet, in an article titled “Right-wing extremism in Europe,” warned: “A specter is haunting Europe — the specter of nationalism, re-emerging and attended by a flurry of right-wing extremist behavior. Its manifestations are apparent in a flare-up of political violence against minorities — foreigners and

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  • Cascading Normalization in the ‘Western Balkans’

    By KARLO BASTA* | 30.06.2011   To a number of Western observers, last month’s arrest of Ratko Mladic brings to an end the long drawn out implosion of the former Yugoslavia. The arrest comes twenty years since the beginning of that country’s break-up, and the wars that made the previously obscure local toponyms, from Srebrenica

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  • The Mediterranean Climate Change Initiative: Realism or Idealism?

    BY DIMITRIS RAPIDIS** | 08.06.2011 Regional strategic cooperation has the exceptional advantage of bringing together states and policy makers that share common concerns, ponder upon same risks and challenges, and aim at bridging differences in a more active and efficient manner. While international organizations and fora, like the United Nations with its Committees or the

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  • The End of Terror or just the Beginning?

    By DEAN CARROLL | 08.05.2011 In April, Europol’s annual European Union Terrorism Situation and Trend Report detailed how fundamentalist groups are deepening links with organised crime and developing ever more complicated tactics and plots – as they attempt to cause harm and disruption. In fact, last year, a total of 249 terrorist attacks were recorded

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  • The European Security Treaty: ‘The Moor has done his duty, let him go’?

    By DMITRY DANILOV The idea of a legally binding European Security Treaty (EST), voiced by Dmitry  Medvedev in June 2008 in Berlin  during his first European visit as the President of Russia, stirred up a keen interest. He left the West wondering whether he was signalising a change of Putin’s foreign policy course. Naturally, there

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  • Blair and Brown Chose Atlanticism over EU

    BY DR. OLIVER DADDOW | 20.04.2011 Despite promising to lance the boil on Europe, New Labour instead pursued “red lines” and Eurosceptic-friendly rhetoric – says Dr Oliver Daddow The lasting images of New Labour’s governance of Britain are likely to be those relating to the country’s involvement in the invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq. Tony Blair’s

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  • England’s Disappearing Regions

    By Aidan Stradling | 24.03.2011 Listing the members of the British royal family and aristocracy is a good way to discover England’s regions. The likes of Wessex, Cornwall and York, Kent, Gloucester and Norfolk all sport their own Duke; and Durham is known as the Land of the Prince Bishops. From history, we know that relations

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