Sunday, 20/8/2017 | 6:03 UTC+1
Cesran International

Recent Articles

  • “The War You Don’t See”

    By Salwa Al Khatib | 24.03.2011   At a time in history when war is all we seem to see on the news, from Palestine, to Iraq to Afghanistan to Sudan and beyond, it seems unlikely that there are any wars that ‘we do not see’ as award winning journalist John Pilger professes in his latest

    Read more
  • On Michael Haneke’s Funny Games US

    By Enes Erbay | 01 June 2010   As a masterpiece in Haneke’s filmography, Funny Games US (2007) is a remake of the Funny Games (1997). This anti-thriller, like the others that precede it, is a critical enquiry of brutality and spectatorship, and undoubtedly it takes a sui generis place among other examples of the aesthetics of violence. The plot

    Read more
  • Modern Business, Modern Warfare and Contemporary Cinema

    By Kadri Kaan Renda | 01 March 2010   A war drama set in Iraq, ‘The Hurt Locker’, by Kathryn Bigelow and a comedy set in the United States, ‘Up in the Air’ by Jason Reitman are reviewed in this article. The two movies, although at first glance appear to have virtually nothing in common, they

    Read more
  • Midnight Express: Hatred Beats Cinematography

    By Alaaddin F. Paksoy | 26 September 2010 “The fault of the movie is simple. It is a movie about Turkey without any Turk in it, neither in the cast nor in the production team. Its hatred against Turks is too overt which makes the narration weak and less riveting than it could have been.” Midnight

    Read more
  • Book Review: Armed Conflict and Displacement: The Protection of Refugees and Displaced Persons under

    In 2010, Alexander Betts argued that it no longer makes sense to speak of the “refugee regime”. Instead, there is…a “refugee regime complex”, in which different institutions overlap [and] exist in parallel to one another’.[1] Melanie Jacques is the latest scholar to take up the challenge of working through the intersections between international refugee law

    Read more
  • Book Review: The Arab-Israeli Conflict in the Media: Producing Shared Memory and National Identity in the Global Television Era

    In The Arab-Israeli Conflict in the Media: Producing Shared Memory and National Identity in the Global Television Era, Tamar Ashuri discusses the tensions between several forces such as nationalism and globalization; economic interests and cultural constraints; shared and cosmopolitan memory. BY PINAR SAYAN | 22 OCTOBER 2012 To do so, she firstly justifies her choice of television

    Read more
  • Book Review: The Politics of Global Regulation

    The process of neoliberal globalization underway since the 1980s has had destabilizing impacts on nation-states and their institutions. BY DR. EVREN TOK  | 22 OCTOBER 2012 State capacity and national policy-making have been substantially transformed, with many scholars characterizing this process as the rescaling-up (and down) of the Westphalian nation state. Manifestations of this process have

    Read more
  • Book Review: Ottomania: The Romantics and the Myth of the Islamic Orient

    Since Edward Said’s Orientalism modern scholarship has developed an ever-intensifying awareness toward Eurocentric notions that have been long imbedded in the Western narrations of the East, or Orient. BY YASIR YILMAZ | MAY 18, 2012 Though one may still frequently come across intentional or unintentional orientalisms in the American (and, in general, Western) media and popular culture, most specialists

    Read more
  • Book Reviews: The Long Divergence: How Islamic Law Held Back the Middle East; Islamic Finance and Law: Theory and Practice in a Globalized World

    The relative economic decline of the Middle Eastern Moslem world after 1500 requires some explanation. Comparing Istanbul, or Cairo, and London or Paris at the turn of the 16th century would not show up any great differences in living standards, cultural sophistication, or comfort. BY JONATHAN WARNER | JUNE 12, 2012 How could it be that

    Read more
  • Book Review:Thucydides on Strategy Athenian and Spartan Grand Strategies in the Peloponnesian War and Their Relevance Today

    It is a common vice of some IR pundits to willingly imprison themselves in a safe so-called ‘conceptual framework’, thinking that they can then express what they want relevantly. Thus they go in for model-building, picking and choosing among the historical literature to prove their hypotheses, unlike the historian, who does not have to prove

    Read more